Twitter Hack: Using “Rollover” Images for Marketing

I recently encountered a viral image created by Japanese Twitter user, @taki_bump. The image, when viewed inline within the Twitter stream, shows a white background with the image of man looking into a telescope. Upon clicking to view the full image, the background changes revealing a starry sky into which the man is gazing. I thought it was really cool, but couldn’t help but think about how this technique could be extended beyond art and used for marketing purposes.

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Power Outage at Super Bowl XLVII: Brands Respond on Twitter


SuperBowl 47 was put on hold by a 34 minute power outage in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, leaving the football game in the dark. Brands reacted quickly over Twitter as fans flocked to the social network for entertainment and to investigate the situation.

The use of a “second screen” is becoming commonplace during television viewing. Nielsen reported in 2012 that 85% of tablet owners watch television and use their tablet at the same time. Since conversations about brands and television are already happening on social networks with high mobile usage like Twitter, it makes sense to backup marketing efforts and take advantage of discussion. This is especially true during high-profile events like the Super Bowl, where social media usage is at an all time high. Events like the power outage during the Super Bowl present a unique opportunity for brands to behave in a light-hearted, humorous manner in order to gain exposure.
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Learn About Social Media ROI from an Epic Twitter Debate

Below is a heated conversation that transpired between Dan Zarrella and Olivier Blanchard over an article written by Zarrella and published by the Harvard Business Review. Zarrella’s article, entitled “How to Calculate the Value of a Like” presents a formula for placing ROI value on a Facebook like. Blanchard claims the formula is too much an approximation and is not very useful. Blanchard explains gives an example how he to attribute ROI to a social media campaign, but Zarrella is concerned about data leakage. Both Blanchard and Zarrella are brilliant minds in the social media industry, but can’t seem to agree on this topic. I recommend reading this discussion, as one can learn a great deal about assessing the ROI of a social media campaign in the process.

See the Twitter debate bellow (presented with Storify):
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Bing it On! Data Says Google Wins The Bing Search Challenge

What is Bing It On?

Bing It On is a valiant marketing effort by Microsoft search engine Bing. The campaign claims that People Chose Bing Web Search Results Over Google Nearly 2 to 1 in Blind Comparison Tests and is fueled by BingItOn.com, a website where people could see for themselves in a blind comparison test (similar to the old Pepsi Challenge comparing Coca-Cola and Pepsi) which search results they prefer, Google’s or Bing’s. The website strips formatting of the SERPs (although it doesn’t do a great job of this as things like author pictures still appear for Google) so that users are unable to distinguish between which search engine is on the left or right. The user can search using a custom search term or use the search suggestions provided by Bing. Search engines switch sides randomly, and the user indicates which side’s results they prefer. They can also answer that it was a “draw” if they cannot choose a winner for that round.
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Only 34 Percent of Americans View Twitter Favorably

A recent poll conducted by Langer Research Associates for ABC News/Washington Post measured the favorability of several large tech companies. The results of the poll demonstrated that only 34 percent of people view Twitter favorably, with 36 percent viewing it unfavorably, and 31 percent indicating that they have no opinion. The poll revealed that unlike Twitter, Google, Apple, and Facebook received positive sentiments.

Graph indicating Twitter is viewed unfavorably

Twitter is the second largest social network with around 500 million member (140 million active users) with 340 million tweets sent per day. There are people who love it, including myself. So, what’s with all the negativity about Twitter?
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